How Do You Care For Wasabi Coleus?

What is Wasabi coleus?

The horticultural variation (cultivar) known as ‘Wasabi’ (Coleus scutellarioides ‘Wasabi’) is recognized for the light-green color of its foliage, which is reminiscent of the color of wasabi, an extremely pungent condiment paste used in Japanese cuisine and produced from the plant Eutrema japonicum.

The Wasabi Coleus belongs to the Lamiaceae family and is derived from the Solenostemon genus. It’s technically not a Coleus, and it was reclassified as Solenostemon few years ago. However, for the sake of simplicity, most gardeners continue to refer to it as Coleus.

Historically, the Solenostemon genus was found in Southeastern Asia and Australia, but seeds from national plant firms provide modern variations.

Coleus Wasabi is well-known for its vibrant color and ability to thrive in both bright light and deep shade.

Is Wasabi coleus a perennial?

Coleus Wasabi, Solenostemon scutellariodes ‘Wasabi,’ is an herbaceous annual that can also be grown as a perennial plant. It is known to thrive almost anyplace as long as there is adequate humidity.

This Coleus looks great in pots, hanging baskets, and even as a houseplant (which is our favorite way to grow Coleus). It has an erect growth habit; thus, it typically works well as the focal point of the pot, surrounded by smaller cascade plants.

This plant can also be grown on its own. Consider another brightly-leaved Coleus, such as Coleus Chocolate Covered Cherry or Coleus Redhead, as a companion plant.

Can you eat Wasabi coleus?

Coleus is not edible and has a low toxicity level.

Although coleus plants are not considered harmful to humans, they can contain some slightly hazardous substances, such as coleonol (forskolin), a diterpene that might produce unpleasant skin irritations in those with sensitive skin if they come into contact with the plant’s sap on extremely rare occasions.

Those chemicals are not concentrated enough in the plant to make it toxic when consumed (recall the adage “the dose makes the poison”).

How do you care for Wasabi coleus?

In terms of care, the Solenostemon scutellariodes ‘Wasabi’ is a low-maintenance plant that is ideal if you don’t have a green thumb. The humidity and water requirements of these adaptable plants are the most important variables.

Light: Solenostemon scutellariodes ‘Wasabi’ enjoys any type of light, including direct sunlight, partial shade, and complete shade. Remember that this is not true for all Coleus plants, although most current cultivars have this amazing capacity.

As long as there is adequate humidity, you can place this plant wherever. Plan on exposing this plant to (any quantity of) light for six to eight hours per day.

Soil: Solenostemon scutellariodes ‘Wasabi’ thrives on normal commercial potting soil. If you want to go the extra mile, utilize rich soil rich in organic matter and perlite to aid with drainage.

Drainage is the most effective technique to tackle problems like root rot and other diseases. Use a well-draining soil or potting mix with this multipurpose plant for the greatest results.

pH: The pH of your soil should be between 5.5 to 7.5 for this Coleus plant, which is classified acidic to neutral. But only if you’re a true stickler for details. It can also live in slightly more alkaline soil most of the time.

Water: Your Solenostemon scutellariodes ‘Wasabi’ loves an evenly moist growth medium in general. When the top inch of soil on your Wasabi Coleus gets dry, it’s a good rule of thumb to water it. During the summer, this may be every day (or twice a day!).

Allow the water to drain from the pot’s bottom. However, do not allow water to pool in a tray where your plant is sitting.

Temperature: Although warm temperatures are desirable for your Wasabi Coleus plant, it may flourish in temperatures ranging from 70 to 100 degrees Fahrenheit. The needs for temperature and humidity are typically interwoven. Make a point of going through the humidity section as well.

Fertilizer: Fertilize your Coleus Wasabi once a month during the growing season (summer to fall) using a simple slow-release fertilizer. You shouldn’t need to add fertilizer during the non-growing seasons, when plant development naturally slows.

How tall does Wasabi coleus get?

Wasabi Coleus has lovely serrated pointed leaves that remain light green throughout the year on a plant with an upright spreading habit of growth.

When cultivated as a houseplant, the Coleus Wasabi can reach a height of 18-36 inches (46-91 cm) and a width of 16-28 inches (41-71 cm). It’s a quick growth that thrives in any location with adequate humidity.

Is Wasabi coleus an indoor plant?

Solenostemon scutellariodes ‘Wasabi,’ often known as Coleus Wasabi, is an herbaceous annual that can also be grown as a perennial plant. It’s known to grow almost anywhere as long as there’s enough humidity.

This Coleus looks great in container gardens, hanging baskets, and even as a houseplant (which is the favorite way to grow Coleus). It has an upright growth habit; thus, it frequently works well as the focal point of the pot, with smaller cascade plants surrounding it.

For several years, Solenostemon scutellariodes ‘Wasabi’ has been a very successful indoor plant that has done well in most houses, if it is given sufficient of water and humidity.

On the other hand, it can absolutely grow outside. It grows well in shady gardens, large planters, and sunny settings with moderate to high humidity.

How do you pronounce Wasabi coleus?

The word “Wasabi” is pronounced wa-SAH-bee. According to the International Coleus Society (ICS), this plant is pronounced wa-SAH-bee, with all three syllables being equal in length.

The Wasabi Coleus belongs to the Lamiaceae family and is derived from the Solenostemon genus. It’s technically not a Coleus, and it was reclassified as Solenostemon few years ago. However, for the sake of simplicity, most gardeners continue to refer to it as Coleus.

How do you propagate Wasabi coleus?

There are a few fundamental stages and ways for propagating a Wasabi Coleus. Here are the best techniques to reproduce this one-of-a-kind plant. Water propagation is the simplest method. Here’s how it works:

  • Cut a 2- to 3-inch (5- to 7.5 cm) stalk from the top of your Wasabi coleus and place it in water. The cut stalks should remain submerged in water for 8 to 10 days.
  • Then you can transfer the cut stalk into a well-draining soil mix. Water it until the soil is moist again.
  • The cuttings should grow within two to six weeks, depending on the weather and how much sunlight they receive at this point.

If a cutting is exposed to light and the right temperature, it will likely germinate within three or four days.

The second method is taking a stem cutting and replanting it in soil. Here’s how:

  • Cut a 6-inch (15 cm) stem from the top of your plant.
  • Make a diagonal cut about ½ inch (1 ¼ cm) below a node (either the leaf axel or its base).
  • Discard the rest of the plant, but keep that stalk with you to replant.
  • Place the stalk in well-draining soil and water it until moist. Then keep it moderately moist until new growth appears.

If the new cutting doesn’t emerge within two weeks, it could be because of insufficient light or too much water.

How much light does Wasabi coleus need?

Scutellariodes Solenostemon ‘Wasabi’ prefers any type of light, including direct sunlight, partial sunlight, and complete shade. Remember that this is not true for all Coleus plants, although most current cultivars have this amazing capacity.

As long as there is adequate humidity, you can place this plant wherever. Plan on exposing this plant to (any quantity of) light for six to eight hours per day.

When the leaves of your Wasabi Coleus burn, you know it’s getting too much light.

When used in flower pots, window boxes, or foundation beds in the ground. Part shade is best, although unlike some coleus, ‘Wasabi’ does not fade in full sun and tolerates heat well. Grows in the shade as well, although the color is more green and less brilliant.

Is Wasabi coleus toxic to cats?

Even if your cat only brushes up against the leaves or blossoms of the coleus plant, it might be toxic. Coleus has an essential oil that is poisonous to cats and dogs and can cause skin irritations and burns if not recognized and treated promptly.

Furthermore, if your cat eats any portion of this plant, it will get gastrointestinal issues. The harmful oils in this plant can also induce respiratory depression or delayed breathing, which can be fatal to your pet.

How do you identify Wasabi?

It’s a warm-weather annual grown for its eye-catching leaves that shouts neon chartreuse. The plant’s leaves are big and serrated, and it produces few (if any) “distracting” flowers.

The Solenostemon scutellariodes ‘Wasabi’ plant grows quickly, reaching a height of 18-36 inches (46-91 cm). It matures to a width of 16-28 inches (41-71 cm). Summer to fall is their growing season.

The Wasabi Coleus belongs to the Lamiaceae family and is derived from the Solenostemon genus. It’s technically not a Coleus, and it was reclassified as Solenostemon few years ago. However, for the sake of simplicity, most gardeners continue to refer to it as Coleus.

Historically, the Solenostemon genus was found in Southeastern Asia and Australia, but seeds from national plant firms provide modern variations.

Are Wasabi coleus poisonous?

Although coleus plants are not considered harmful to people, they can contain some slightly toxic compounds, such as coleonol (forskolin), a diterpene that, on extremely rare occasions, might produce unpleasant skin irritations in those with sensitive skin if they come into contact with the plant’s sap.

Those components are not concentrated enough in the plant to make it toxic when consumed (remember the adage “the dose makes the poison”).

Coleus, on the other hand, has essential oils that are toxic to dogs and cats and can produce bad reactions if they eat the plant: vomiting, diarrhea, and so on.

Are Wasabi coleus toxic to dogs?

Coleus Wasabi is poisonous to dogs and cats because of its hazardous chemicals (essential oils). Ingestion of these annual plants may result in diarrhea, anorexia, bloody vomiting, and depression. In most circumstances, this plant is not considered dangerous.

While it is somewhat harmful to humans, the more typical problem is that it can cause skin irritation – particularly on very sensitive skin.

How do you prune Wasabi coleus?

The primary purpose of pinching back coleus is to promote branching and a denser foliage cover, both of which are highly desirable in a foliage plant like coleus. Pruning is only required in the traditional sense to tighten lanky growth or to remove dead stems.

Summer is the time to prune off leggy growth. Dormant leaf buds are found all along the stems of coleus and are activated when growth is eliminated from the branch tip. Pruning off lanky branches will stimulate those latent nodes, giving the plant a bushier appearance.

Using sharp, hygienic pruning scissors, snip off the undesired growth just above a set of leaves a few inches from the stem’s base.

Is Wasabi coleus an outdoor plant?

Coleus Wasabi can be grown inside or outside, but there are some variables to consider if you want it to be thriving in your own backyard.

For several years, Solenostemon scutellariodes ‘Wasabi’ has been a very successful indoor plant that has thrived in most families, provided it with sufficient of water and humidity.

It can, however, grow quite well outside. It thrives in shady gardens, large planters, and sunny settings with moderate or high humidity.

Part shade is suitable for this plant in its natural habitat. They endure heat well, especially when grown in the shade. They will, however, perish in the frost.

Coleus plants, in general, are susceptible to frost damage. They can survive outside in hardiness zones 9 and 10, but you should plant them to overwinter indoors if you want them to live through the winter.

If you cultivate this plant as an annual, you can compost the plants after they die from frost and replant the next year.

How do you repot Wasabi coleus?

Coleus grows to the size of the pot, much like a goldfish. It will continue to grow, especially broader, if you give it a larger pot. If you want to grow monster Coleus plants, we recommend repotting every winter.

There’s no need to repot if you don’t desire a larger Wasabi Coleus. I would still recommend changing out the soil every year or two to keep the growing medium fresh.

In terms of care, the Solenostemon scutellariodes ‘Wasabi’ is a low-maintenance plant that is ideal if you don’t have a green thumb.

How often should you water a Wasabi coleus?

In general, your Solenostemon scutellariodes ‘Wasabi’ prefers a growing medium that is equally moist. When the top inch of soil on your Wasabi Coleus gets dry, it’s a good rule of thumb to water it. During the summer, this may be every day (or twice a day!).

Make sure you’re not watering the leaves themselves, as this might lead to disease and mildew growth. Allow the water to drain from the pot’s bottom. However, do not allow water to pool in a tray where your plant is sitting.

Brown leaf tips are a common indicator that your Solenostemon scutellariodes ‘Wasabi’ isn’t receiving enough humidity.

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