Parallel Venation Leaves & Plants | Parallel Venation Examples
Plants

Parallel Venation Leaves & Plants | Parallel Venation Examples

Parallel Venation Plants Parallel venation is found in plants with leaves divided into a network of veins that are parallel on both surfaces. This structure is thought to increase the surface area of the leaf which in turn assists in gas exchange. Venation is the branching pattern of the veins of leaves. All plants have…

Reticulate Venation  Leaves & Plants | Reticulate Venation Diagram & Examples
Plants

Reticulate Venation Leaves & Plants | Reticulate Venation Diagram & Examples

  What is Reticulate Venation? Reticulate venation is a pattern of branching veins that are visible on the surface of leaves. Reticulate venation can be seen when looking at the leaf’s underside, or sometimes even in cross-section. The patterns vary depending on which type they are and what species it belongs to. Reticulate venation often…

Tracheophytes Definition | Tracheophytes Examples & Characteristics
Plants

Tracheophytes Definition | Tracheophytes Examples & Characteristics

Tracheophytes Tracheophytes are vascular plants with lignified and non-lignified tissues that include angiosperms, clubmosses, ferns, horsetails, and gymnosperms. Compared to non-vascular plants, these plants have vascular tissues that allow them to grow to large sizes. Nutrients and water in the form of organic solutes are distributed throughout the plant body by the xylem, and the…

Definition of Embryophyte  | Examples of Embryophyte 
Plants

Definition of Embryophyte | Examples of Embryophyte 

Embryophyte Embryophyte is a plant that develops from an embryo within the seed. The embryo, which is called the “plantlet” or “prothallus,” may be found in a number of different places on the parent plant, including:  The leaves; stems; roots; and flowers (in some cases).  In these locations, it will grow into a new plant…

Difference Between Sporangiospores and Conidiospores
Plants

Difference Between Sporangiospores and Conidiospores

Difference Between Sporangiospores and Conidiospores Sporangiospores and Conidiospores Sporangiospores and conidiospores are two types of spores that come from fungi. Sporangiospores are the product of asexual reproduction by means of sporulation, while conidiospores result from sexual reproduction through meiosis in higher fungal organisms. The main difference between these two is that sporangiospore release can only…

What is the Function of Sporangium | What is Sporangiophores
Plants

What is the Function of Sporangium | What is Sporangiophores

What is the Function of Sporangium What is Sporangium A sporangium is a structure found in plants and other species that is responsible for the production and storage of spores. Spores are haploid structures found in organisms that aid in germinating and the formation of new organisms. In other words, they aid in the reproduction…

Examples of Homosporous vs Heterosporous Plants
Plants

Examples of Homosporous vs Heterosporous Plants

Homosporous vs. Heterosporous Plants Plants that produce two kinds of spores are called heterosporous. The spores can be male or female, and they grow in different parts of the plant. This type of plant is typically called a gymnosperm. Heterosporous plants include  Selaginella, Salvinia, and Marsilea, etc. In contrast, homosporous plants only produce one kind…

Examples & Advantages of Heterospory | Disadvantages of Heterospory
Plants

Examples & Advantages of Heterospory | Disadvantages of Heterospory

Heterospory What is Heterospory?  Heterospory is the development of spores of various sizes and sexes by land plant sporophytes. The smaller microspore is male, while the larger megaspore is female. Several plant groups, including clubmosses, arborescent horsetails, and progymnosperms, independently evolved heterospory from isospory during the Devonian period. This happened as a result of the…

Micro

Flagellum Function in Prokaryotic Cells

Flagellum Function in Prokaryotic Cells Bacteria Flagellum A flagellum is a tail-like structure found on cells (bacteria) that help them move around and be more productive. Flagella are composed of proteins, and since they don’t need to separate like organelles, they can work together to propel the cell in many directions. The flagellum is an…

Micro

Lophotrichous Bacteria Examples

Lophotrichous Bacteria Examples Lophotrichous Bacteria Lophotrichous bacteria have multiple flagella located at the same spot on the bacterial surfaces which act in concert to drive the bacteria in a single direction. In many cases, the bases of multiple flagella are surrounded by a specialized region of the cell membrane, called the polar organelle. Lophotrichous are those bacteria that have multiple flagella at one polar…