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How Do You Dig Up A Boston Fern?

How Do You Dig Up A Boston Fern?

It is best to use a shovel or trowel and dig around the root ball of the plant, being careful not to damage the roots. Digging up an established Boston fern can be tricky and should be done with care.

Dig up your Boston fern in the fall, before winter sets in and the ground freezes. Do not remove the tops of plants, as this will cause them to die quicker.

Avoid injuring roots and stems during digging by gently circling around plant base with a shovel or trowel, gradually working your way outwards towards portions of the plant that are easier to extract without damaging root systems or breaking off stems.

How do you divide a root bound Boston fern?

Boston ferns are one of the most adaptable plants available. They can be grown indoors all year and outside during the warmer months.

They look great in containers, whether hanging, sitting on a table, or in a garden border. Boston ferns can also be grown as a summer annual by planting them directly in the ground.

Boston ferns look great with any color of flowering annual and make a nice focal point in larger mixed combination plantings.

The following is how to divide a Boston fern:

  • Begin with a mature Boston fern plant. Take the plant outside to work on it, or place it on paper, a plastic-coated tablecloth, or a tarp to catch any spills.
  • Take the plant out of its pot.
  • Cut the root ball in half with a pair of garden forks. If you don’t have forks, a sharp knife can be used to carefully slice through the roots, or you can gently tear the roots apart with your hands.
  • Cut the root ball into quarters once more. Continue halving the roots into smaller sections as long as each has a healthy root mass with a crown of foliage.
  • Repot the plants in individual pots or group them together in a larger container. Water them thoroughly to help the soil settle around the plant roots.
  • Give the plants bright, indirect sunlight and they’ll grow into full, lush plants in no time.

How do you divide an overgrown Boston fern?

Spring is the greatest time to divide ferns. To separate a fern, first remove it from its original pot or dig up the clump. Brush off and shake out as much soil as you can once it’s out. Because ferns have very tight, interconnecting root balls, it may not be much.

Then, using a long-serrated knife, cut the root ball into halves or quarters. Make sure each area has leaves linked to it, and attempt to keep the quantity of leaves balanced. Fern roots are robust, and cutting through them may need some effort, but the plant can handle it.

After separating your fern, transfer each portion to a new pot or garden spot and fill it with well-draining but fairly water-retentive soil, preferably with some grit and masses of organic matter. Water each portion thoroughly and continue to water more frequently than usual while the plants grow.

How do you fix an overwatered Boston fern?

Ferns of all varieties prefer to grow in moist soil. They want a happy medium, where the soil remains damp but never saturated. One of the most prevalent causes of a Boston Fern dying is overwatering.

A Boston Fern that has been overwatered will betray its unhappiness by yellowing and wilted leaves. Waterlogged soil causes root rot and other illnesses to grow in the plant. It can be difficult to salvage a plant once root rot has set in, therefore prevention is the name of the game.

If you suspect your plant has been overwatered and is exhibiting some of the symptoms listed above, you should take the following procedures to revive your dying Boston Fern.

To inspect the roots, gently slip your Boston Fern out of the pot and remove any excess soil. Rotten roots are black/brown, brittle, mushy, and have an unpleasant odor.

All infected roots should be pruned with sterile pruning shears. If you must prune many roots, you should also prune the foliage to allow the remaining roots to support the plant.

Rinse the good roots gently to eliminate as much old soil as possible. Because the pathogens that caused root rot are still present in old soil, it is advisable to sow in new soil. Select a new pot that is slightly larger than the plant. Make certain that it has plenty of drainage holes.

Repot your Boston Fern in a well-draining houseplant potting mix, ideally with extra perlite or coarse sand for drainage.

Water your Boston Fern only when the top 1-2 inches of soil feel dry, rather than on a regular basis.

How do you keep a Boston fern alive outside?

As a houseplant, Boston fern can be grown indoors. However, it also grows well outside in USDA zones 9-11’s warm, humid weather. When cultivated outside, this fern requires a lot of water.

Frost kills Boston fern completely, causing it to appear dead, but it grows back in the spring. The Boston fern grows well in partial to full shade or in filtered light. This makes the plant suitable for damp or shaded areas, and it adds a splash of color when it flourishes.

Boston fern prefers well-drained organic soils. To improve fern growth, supplement your soil with compost, mulch, or finely chopped bark.

These ferns would look great on the front porch. They flourish in regions with filtered sunshine. The morning sun is good, but the afternoon sun can burn the fronds off.

Boston ferns thrive in Florida’s subtropical environments. They create a lovely mid-height ground cover with dapples of shadow

How do you know if a Boston fern is root bound?

Roots poking through the drainage opening are one indicator. Don’t wait until the pot has become severely root bound. If the roots are growing in a tangled mass on top of the soil or the potting mix is so root-compacted that water flows right through the pot, it’s time to repot the plant.

Fern plants dislike very big containers, although they can become pot-bound as their roots grow and expand. Overgrowth that makes the plant appear too huge for the pot, withering or yellowing fronds, poor growing, or a damaged pot are all signs of this.

How do you let a Boston fern go dormant?

The Boston fern (Nephrolepis exaltata), often known as the sword fern, is a common fern found in many tropical places across the world. It is also widely kept as a houseplant, owing to its low light requirements.

This fern’s foliage remains evergreen. Its sword-shaped, blue-green fronds with numerous small leaflets grow tall and arch as they mature.

If conditions change in your home and you want to let your plant rest, it is best to put it into a cool room with no light. Remember, don’t place the fern outside if temperatures are below 45 degrees Fahrenheit.

If you don’t have enough light to overwinter a Boston at your home, you can place the plant in its pot in a garage, cellar, or outdoor building where the temperature does not fall below 55 degrees Fahrenheit. Light is not necessary, but watering once a month is recommended.

How do you look after a Boston fern?

The basics are:

Soil: Organically rich, loamy soil with adequate drainage is ideal for these ferns. Poorly drained soil can induce root rot, which can eventually destroy the plant. Use a peat-based potting mix for Boston fern plants in containers.

Water: It is critical to keep the soil mildly damp (but not saturated) at all times when growing Boston ferns. If the soil dries up, the fern’s leaf will quickly dry out and fall off the plant.

Watering should be reduced significantly throughout the fall and winter months because the plant is not actively developing. However, if you observe the fronds drying out, increase the amount of water you give the plant.

Temperature and Humidity: Boston ferns thrive in temperatures ranging from 65 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit. They are unable to withstand high heat or cold.

Temperatures above 95 degrees Fahrenheit, as well as temperatures below 35 degrees Fahrenheit, might be harmful to them. Boston ferns require high humidity as well.

They flourish in humidity levels above 80%. Set your fern on a tray filled with water and pebbles to increase the humidity surrounding it.

Fertilizer: From spring until early fall, feed your Boston fern once a month with a half-strength liquid houseplant fertilizer. During the late fall and winter months, no fertilizer is required.

How do you make Boston fern lush?

The Boston fern is a luxuriant, traditional plant prized for its lacy, vivid green fronds. When planted inside, this low-maintenance plant exudes elegance and sophistication.

The majority of ferns thrive in full or partial shade. Ample shade will result in lush, dark green foliage. Depending on your region, we recommend 65 to 75 percent shade. (In the winter, when the days are shorter, less may be required.)

Inverse leaves, which appear to be turned upside down, are a sign that the plant is too dry. If the leaves turn uphill and the fronds droop, it’s an indication that the plant is too wet.

If you find that your Boston fern has inverse leaves and looks more brown than green, but still has healthy foliage, water your fern well using room-temperature tap water. When this happens, you can trim off one or two of the lower fronds.

How do you make a Boston fern bushier?

When it comes to Boston fern plant pruning, you should always look to its leaves for ideas. It is not unusual for this plant to have old, discolored fronds. These fronds might be yellow or brown in color.

Older leaves are frequently shaded out by new growth. There may be leafless runners dangling from the plant as well. All of them are signals that trimming may be required.

Pruning is best done during repotting, when plants can be drastically reduced in size. Boston fern, in fact, reacts well to rigorous pruning, which fosters more prolific, bushy growth while correcting dull, lanky growth.

Always use clean, sharp pruning shears or scissors while cutting Boston fern.

How do you plant Boston fern bulbs?

Boston fern plants can also be propagated by dividing them. Allow the fern roots to dry out slightly before removing the Boston fern from its pot. Slice the fern’s root ball in half, then quarters, and lastly eighths with a large serrated knife.

Trim everything except 1 12-to-2-inch (4 to 5 cm.) of roots to fit in a 4- or 5-inch (10 or 12.5 cm.) clay container. Cover the centered new ferns roots with a piece of broken pot or a rock and add some well-draining potting material.

If the fronds appear unhealthy, they can be cut to display the newly emerging Boston fern branches and fiddleheads. Maintain a moist but not damp environment (put the container atop some pebbles to absorb any standing water) and watch your new Boston fern baby grow.

How do you plant Boston fern runners?

Boston fern shoots (also known as Boston fern runners) or by dividing Boston fern plants.

Simply pull the Boston fern runner from the base of the plant with a gentle tug or cut with a sharp knife for propagating Boston fern plants.

It is not necessary for the offset to have roots because it will form roots anywhere it comes into contact with soil. If the offset was removed by hand, it can be planted right away; however, if the offset was cut from the parent plant, lay it aside for a couple of days to let the cut to dry and heal up.

Boston fern shoots should be put in a container with a drainage hole in sterile potting soil. Plant the stalk just deep enough to keep it upright and lightly water it.

Cover the propagating Boston ferns with a clear plastic bag and place them in bright indirect light at 60-70 degrees Fahrenheit (16-21 C.). Remove the bag when the branch begins to show fresh growth and continue to maintain damp but not wet.

How do you repot a Boston fern?

Water the Boston fern a few days before repotting to help the dirt attach to the roots and making repotting simpler.

  • The new pot should be no more than 1 or 2 inches (2.5-5 cm) larger in diameter than the old one.
  • Plant the fern in a small pot rather than a large one since the surplus potting soil in the pot absorbs moisture, which can cause root rot.
  • Fill the new pot with 2 to 3 inches of fresh potting soil (5-8 cm). Hold the fern in one hand, then tilt the pot and slowly guide the plant out of the container.
  • Fill in around the root ball with potting soil up to about 1 inch (2.5 cm) from the top of the new container.
  • If required, adjust the dirt in the container’s bottom. The fern should be planted at the same depth as it was in the prior container. Planting too deeply might be harmful to the plant and result in root rot.
  • Water the fern thoroughly after patting the soil around the roots to remove air pockets.
  • For a couple of days, place the plant in partial shade or indirect light, then return it to its original area and resume regular care.

How do you repot a dying Boston fern?

The Boston fern is a durable plant with a life span of 5 to 10 years. If your plant is not thriving, you may need to transplant it into a bigger pot or, even better, repot it.

After the fern has taken root in its new container, be sure to root-prune the original fern. Begin by removing all but small roots. Remove any old and dead leaves and then soak the soil with water.

Ferns need moisture but excess water can lead to root rot. If you want the Boston fern to be bushier, prune off a few of the broader fronds and place them just below the soil surface. This will encourage new growth in those areas.

How do you resuscitate a Boston fern?

If you left your fern outside during a cold spell, it’s undoubtedly covered with dead leaf – but that doesn’t necessarily indicate the plant is doomed. With careful care, your fern may recover and produce new growth as the weather warms.

To resuscitate a fern that has lost its leaves, it is necessary to improve the climatic conditions by increasing humidity, watering more frequently so that the soil is continually moist, and keeping the temperature between 65- and 75-degrees F. New leaves should begin to sprout.

Using a humidifier, raise the humidity to 50%. The most effective technique to boost humidity around your fern is to use a humidifier, and some humidifiers allow you to set the exact humidity so that you can accurately simulate the greater humidity conditions of the fern’s tropical original environment.

Mist your fern every day and place it near other potted plants. If you group many plants together, you can create a humid microclimate that is more conducive to the survival of your dying fern. Misting helps to prevent water loss from the leaves, allowing your fern shoulder to begin to regenerate.

Water the fern as needed to keep the soil constantly and evenly moist. There is no general suggestion for a watering regimen for ferns because watering varies depending on the size of the fern and the humidity of the space.

To revitalize your fern, keep the temperature between 65°F and 75°F during the day and slightly cooler at night. Higher temperatures produce increased evaporation, increasing the danger of leaf drop, while low temperatures harm tropical ferns.

How do you revive an old Boston fern?

Underwatering, too much sun, or soil that drains too quickly are the most common causes of dying outdoor ferns.

Outdoor ferns thrive under trees because they require shade from the sun and wind. Plant outside ferns in compost-enriched soil to maintain adequate moisture and prevent the leaves from turning brown and dying.

Ferns turn a pale green color due to a lack of nutrients in the soil. If the fern has depleted all of the nutrients in the potting soil, the leaves turn a pale green color and the leaf development rate slows significantly. Too much sunlight can also cause the leaves to turn a bright green.

To resurrect dying ferns, mimic the fern’s natural environment with higher levels of humidity and shade, and water the fern as needed to keep the soil continuously moist. To help stimulate new growth and revitalize the fern, cut back any brown, yellow, or decaying leaves.

How do you split a Boston fern?

Boston fern plants can also be propagated by dividing them. Allow the fern roots to dry out slightly before removing the Boston fern from its pot. Slice the fern’s root ball in half, then quarters, and lastly eighths with a large serrated knife.

A Boston fern is simple to divide.

Allow the plant to dry out a little first. When the roots aren’t damp, they’re easier to maintain. Then, remove the fern from its pot and place it sideways on sheets of newspaper or cardboard.

Next, cut the root-ball in half with a large serrated knife. Then, cut each half into halves, and each quarter into eights. Now, take a one- or two-inch chunk and cut it away.

Remove all but 1 1/2 to 2 inches of roots from this. The idea is to create a plant that is small enough to fit inside a 4- or 5-inch clay container.

Place a broken ceramic piece over the container’s drainage hole, add a little quantity of humus, well-draining potting mix, and then place the fern in the pot. More mixture should be used to fill in the spaces between the pot and the roots.

As a reservoir for water, allow a one-inch gap between the top of the potting mixture and the rim of the pot.

How do you split and repot a Boston fern?

Boston ferns are one of the most adaptable plants available. They can be grown indoors all year and outside during the warmer months.

The following is how to divide a Boston fern:

  • Begin with a mature Boston fern plant. Take the plant outside to work on it, or place it on paper, a plastic-coated tablecloth, or a tarp to catch any spills.
  • Take the plant out of its pot.
  • Cut the root ball in half with a pair of garden forks. If you don’t have forks, a sharp knife can be used to carefully slice through the roots, or you can gently tear the roots apart with your hands.
  • Cut the root ball into quarters once more. Continue halving the roots into smaller sections as long as each has a healthy root mass with a crown of foliage.
  • Repot the plants in individual pots or group them together in a larger container. Water them thoroughly to help the soil settle around the plant roots.
  • Give the plants bright, indirect sunlight and they’ll grow into full, lush plants in no time.

How do you style a Boston fern?

Since they were introduced to the public in the nineteenth century, Boston ferns (Nephrolepis exaltata ‘Bostoniensis’) have made themselves at home.

They were popular as houseplants even as design fashions evolved throughout the years, as they were a staple of Victorian parlors.

They also made their way outside to adorn patios, porches, and decks, and in the warmest winter conditions, they even established themselves as landscaping plants.

They have a reputation for being picky, but once you learn their eccentricities, they’re not difficult to please.

How to Grow a Boston Fern in the Landscape:

Boston ferns are excellent filler plants for gardens in warm-weather climates. Choose a location with dappled to full shade, good soil, and that is generally humid but not soggy.

Treat them like houseplants, fertilizing on a regular basis and making sure they don’t receive too hot or too much sun. Mealybugs, scale, and spider mites should all be avoided.

How do you take care of a Boston crinkle fern?

Crinkle Ferns are part of the genus Nephrolepis, which has forty-four species from tropical America. Heinrich Schott defined the genus for the first time in 1834 on a journey to South America, when he classified numerous new species such as Peace Lilies, Dumb Canes, and Elephant Ears (Alocasia).

The name is originated from Greek, with nephro meaning “kidney” and lepis meaning “scale,” which relates to the protective skins of the spores beneath its fronds.

The basic care is as follows.

  • Provide a bright, indirect setting that is not in direct sunlight or heavy shade. Too little light combined with over-watering will quickly result in yellowed leaves and a loss in health.
  • Keep the soil uniformly moist, allowing the top quarter to dry out between hydrations. Excess moisture accumulating in the plant’s core foliage might cause southern blight or yellowed fronds.
  • Make a pebble tray to keep the surrounding moisture steady, especially in warm or sunny regions.
  • Fertilize with a ‘Houseplant’ labeled feed every four weeks in the spring and summer, and every six weeks in the winter.
  • To avoid droughts, repot every two or three years using a ‘Houseplant’ labeled compost.

How do you take care of a Boston fern outside Colorado?

Boston ferns (Nephrolepis exaltata ‘Bostoniensis’) are great for hanging baskets, container gardens, rock gardens and even as ground covers. They can tolerate soil conditions that are well drained.

Wherever you plant it outside Colorado, be sure the site is shady or semi-shaded, protected from sun and wind. These conditions will result in a lush plant with attractive fronds and minimal to no pests or diseases.

In most zones, Boston ferns are perennial and will survive the winter. If you live in a cold climate, mulch with evergreen boughs during the winter months.

When grown indoors this plant requires cool temperatures and moderate light, which makes placement at window sills or near a southern window ideal. When placed outdoors, they do well in sun or partial shade with good drainage. They do not require a formal soil block, but they do need good drainage.

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