How Do You Take Care Of A Kalanchoe Laxiflora?

How do you take care of a Kalanchoe Laxiflora?

Kalanchoe Laxiflora is a succulent subshrub that grows to a height of 20 inches (50 cm). The leaves are elliptical in form, gray or green in color, and sometimes tinted crimson, particularly around the edges, with elder leaves typically having a red-violet hue.

The inflorescence, which bears orange bell-shaped blooms, can reach a height of one foot (30 cm) or more above the shrub. Consider the following when providing care:

Sunlight

Kalanchoe Laxiflora enjoys bright, sunny areas, especially during the growth season in the summer. Consider a south-facing window during the winter.

Light from the north is helpful as well, so long as the leaves are not in direct sunlight (which will burn them).

Water

Maintain Kalanchoe Laxiflora a moderate watering schedule throughout the summer and drastically limit watering during the winter.

Allow the soil surface to dry out between watering, and the plant can nearly completely dry out in the winter. Keep an eye out for symptoms of water stress on the fleshy leaves.

Use room-temperature water. Kalanchoe plants prefer a soil that drains quickly, with over-watering being the biggest cause of plant death.

Soil should be slightly moist at all times, but not soggy. Allow the soil to dry out between watering. New growth increases water needs.

Soil

Use a cactus potting mix (or a mixture of equal parts sand, peat moss, and perlite) to ensure proper drainage. Porous soil allows the tiny hairs on the roots to breathe. If a peat mixture is used, remember to keep the plant dry in the winter, as peat will hold too much water.

Fertilizers

Feed plants every two weeks during the summer with a balanced concentration fertilizer (such as 20-20-20). Use a diluted solution of fertilizer during the winter. Remove dead leaves for an attractive appearance and to prevent disease.

Temperature

Kalanchoe Laxiflora is a tender, frost-sensitive plant. In general, it is best to avoid temperatures below 55 degrees F. (13 C.). This can be accomplished by moving the plant to a sunnier location during the winter. If you are growing Kalanchoe outdoors and freezing temperatures are predicted, cover the shrub with a blanket or plastic wrap to protect it from cold damage.

Humidity

Kalanchoe Laxiflora is tolerant of slightly dry conditions, but do not allow it to get too dry. This can be accomplished by misting the plant every other day or so during the summer. Misting will also help keep the leaves from burning in direct sunlight.

Pests and Diseases

Kalanchoe Laxiflora is susceptible to scale insects and fungal diseases, mostly in humid areas. These problems are typically only a problem during the winter. You can treat them using insecticidal soap or spray, rinsing all surfaces of the plant in order to protect it from disease.

Repotting

Re-pot Kalanchoe Laxiflora once every two or three years. Use a container one size larger than the current one.

Propagation

Though Kalanchoe Laxiflora is difficult to propagate from leaf or stem cuttings and offsets it is possible to root them through the use of cuttings taken in the spring. Cut off a section of stem that is at least 2-3 inches (5-8 cm) long with a clean knife.

Lay the stem in a shallow pot filled with moist potting soil, and place it in a sunny location. The leaf should turn green and become healthier within two weeks.

Pruning

Kalanchoe Laxiflora is not a difficult plant to take care of, but you must be careful. It can become too leggy or floppy.

There are several types of pruning that you must be aware of, and this article will go over the type that is most commonly done: Leaf pruning can be done during the winter months when leaves decay and turn brown, and remove the entire leaf to make sure new leaves are emerging.

Is Kalanchoe Laxiflora toxic to cats or dogs?

The Kalanchoe Laxiflora is toxic to both cats and dogs. The sap can cause irritation to eyes and mouth, as well as diarrhea, vomiting and even death.

The leaves of the Kalanchoe Laxiflora are mildly toxic to both cats and dogs. The difference in appearance between the two plants can be confusing.

However, the leaves of both plants are very similar in shape and coloring. Symptoms include difficulty breathing, vomiting, diarrhea and even death.

Is Kalanchoe Laxiflora a succulent?

Kalanchoe Laxiflora is a succulent subshrub that grows to a height of 20 inches (50 cm). The leaves are elliptical in form, gray or green in color, and sometimes tinted crimson, particularly around the edges, with elder leaves typically having a red-violet hue.

The inflorescence, which bears orange bell-shaped blooms, can reach a height of one foot (30 cm) or more above the shrub.

Kalanchoe Laxiflora enjoys bright, sunny areas, especially during the growth season in the summer. Consider a south-facing window during the winter.

Light from the north is helpful as well, so long as the leaves are not in direct sunlight (which will burn them).

How often do you water Kalanchoe Laxiflora?

Maintain Kalanchoe Laxiflora a moderate watering schedule throughout the summer and drastically limit watering during the winter.

Allow the soil surface to dry out between watering, and the plant can nearly completely dry out in the winter. Keep an eye out for symptoms of water stress on the fleshy leaves.

Do not use room-temperature water. Kalanchoe plants prefer a soil that drains quickly, with over-watering being the biggest cause of plant death.

Soil should be slightly moist at all times, but not soggy. Allow the soil to dry out between watering. New growth increases water needs.

Kalanchoe Laxiflora is susceptible to scale insects and fungal diseases, mostly in humid areas. These problems are typically only a problem during the winter. You can treat them using insecticidal soap or spray, rinsing all surfaces of the plant in order to protect it from disease.

How do you prune Kalanchoe Laxiflora?

Kalanchoe Laxiflora is not very difficult to take care of, but you must be careful. It can become too leggy or floppy. There are several types of pruning that you must be aware of, and this article will go over the type that is most commonly done:

  • Leaf pruning can be done during the winter months when leaves decay and turn brown, and remove the entire leaf to make sure new leaves are emerging.
  • Kalanchoe Laxiflora is a frost-sensitive perennial. It is best to avoid temperatures below 55 degrees F. (13 C.). This can be accomplished by moving the plant to a sunnier location during the winter. If you are growing Kalanchoe outdoors and freezing temperatures are predicted, cover the shrub with a blanket or plastic wrap to protect it from cold damage.
  • Kalanchoe Laxiflora does not tolerate wet or overly-moist conditions well. Allow the soil to dry out between watering.
  • For a succulent plant, Kalanchoe Laxiflora does not take well to being pruned. When trimming (and in general care) some care must be taken to ensure that the plant is not damaged by pruning.

How do you propagate Kalanchoe Laxiflora?

Though Kalanchoe Laxiflora is difficult to propagate from leaf or stem cuttings and offsets it is possible to root them through the use of cuttings taken in the spring. The following are procedures when propagating Kalanchoe Laxiflora;

Propagation by stem cutting

  • Cut off a section of stem that is at least 2-3 inches (5-8 cm) long with a clean knife. Lay the stem in a shallow pot filled with moist potting soil, and place it in a sunny location. The leaf should turn green and become healthier within two weeks.
  • If you notice the leaves turning brown and dying, immediately remove the leaves from the stem.
  • After two weeks, begin watering your cutting with a weak water solution of a half-strength concentration of fertilizer until you see new growth appear. Once new growth appears, move it to a brighter area and water more frequently.
  • Once your cutting has established new growth, it is ready to be repotted.

Propagation by leaf cutting

  • Cut off a leaf that is at least 2-3 inches (5-8 cm) long but does not have more than six leaves. Lay the leaf in an 8 inches (20 cm) tall container filled with moist potting soil, and place it in a sunny area. The leaf should turn green and become healthier within two weeks.
  • If you notice the leaves turning brown and dying, immediately remove the leaves from the stem.
  • After two weeks, begin watering your cutting with a weak water solution of a half-strength concentration of fertilizer until you see new growth appear. Once new growth appears, move it to a brighter area and water more frequently.
  • Once your cutting has established new growth, it is ready to be repotted.

Propagation by offsets

  • New offsets should appear within one month. When the new offsets are at least one-half inch (1 cm) high, cut them from the parent plant and plant them in a pot filled with moist potting soil
  • The plant will root very quickly in this situation. Do not move your new offsets if they are small or they may die faster; keep them in direct sunlight.
  • Once the offsets are at least one and a half to two inches (3-5 cm) high, plant them in your garden and water them daily.
  • Once your cuttings have rooted, they can be transplanted into individual pots filled with moist potting soil.

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