How Do You Care For Aglaonema Mary Ann?

How Do You Care For Aglaonema Mary Ann?

Caring for Aglaonema Mary Ann is not difficult. This plant will do well in a medium to bright light location and room temperature or slightly warmer temperatures.

Regular watering will help keep the leaves looking healthy, while also making it easier to care for since you shouldn’t have to worry about letting the soil become too dry.

Your Aglaonema Mary Ann enjoys temps between 60 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit. Avoid drafty regions and temperatures below 60 degrees Fahrenheit throughout the winter. The following are the factors to consider when caring for Aglaonema Mary Ann;

Sunlight: 

Aglaonema Mary Ann thrives in moderate to bright indirect light. Daily exposure to direct sunlight may cause yellow or dark spots on the leaves. Aglaonema Mary Ann needs bright light.

Water:

Your Aglaonema Mary Ann needs to be watered frequently, but make sure that the water drains out of the plant. Do not let the soil dry out. Water sparingly at first and allow the soil to drain completely. Add water to the pot only if it is completely dry and lower the soil level in the pot by about 1/4″.

Soil:

Aglaonema Mary Ann prefers normal, well aerated and evenly moist soil. Poor drainage can cause root rot. If the soil is constantly wet, it will cause the roots to become rotten and will eventually kill the plant. A good potting mix that drains well is necessary for this plant.

Temperature:

Aglaonema Mary Ann requires temperatures between 60 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit during the winter months. Keep drafts out of the room, as this plant can brighten up a dark room when kept indoors.

Fertilizer:

Aglaonema Mary Ann can be easily fertilized using a general purpose houseplant fertilizer diluted to 1/2 strength (as per package instructions) once a month in spring and summer. A good quality liquid fertilizer is preferable to powdered types.

Humidity: 

Your Aglaonema Mary Ann should be placed in an area with high humidity of 60-80%. For example, when placing in an area of low humidity, such as a bathroom or kitchen, place your plant by a humidifier or next to a steamy shower.

Repotting:

Your Aglaonema Mary Ann should be repotted every two or three years to avoid root rot, mealybugs and fungal diseases. Maintain proper drainage by letting some air flow through your Aglaonema Mary Ann potting mix.

Propagation:

You can propagate Aglaonema Mary Ann by taking stem or leaf cuttings, division or by offsets. Cut the leaf into one inch pieces and plant in containers that contain a well-drained, moist and peaty mixture. Do not over water the cuttings or they will rot. Place in a warm, dark location until plants root. Once rooted, transfer to proper potting soil and grow as usual.

Pruning:

Pruning should be done in early spring or after flowering. Pruning should be minimal as this will keep Aglaonema Mary Ann compact instead of tall and leggy. Over pruning may cause the plant to lose its variegated leaves.

Flowering:

Aglaonema Mary Ann blooms in the summer months in clusters of white and yellow flowers. High light is needed for blooming to occur.

Pests and Diseases:

Aglaonema Mary Ann is prone to spider mites, which produce small webbing and tiny pale yellow spots on the leaves. Spray regularly with water to keep soil from drying out. Spider Mite infestations can be reduced by moving your plant away from drafty areas and increased air circulation. Reduce the amount of time between watering as well as increase humidity levels around your plant.

What Is Aglaonema Mary Ann?

Aglaonema Mary Ann is a genus of perennial flowering plants in the Araceae family. It is native to tropical rainforests from Africa east to tropical Asia, and south to Australia and New Zealand. They are known as Chinese evergreens and belong to one of the oldest groups of cultivated plants.

Aglaonema Mary Ann is an ideal houseplant for beginners. This kind of Aglaonemas, like other Aglaonemas, prefers warmth and high humidity, but will tolerate moderate humidity. It will develop into a luxuriant, bushy plant over time.

Your Aglaonema Mary Ann enjoys temps between 60 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit. Avoid drafty regions and temperatures below 60 degrees Fahrenheit throughout the winter.

Feed your Aglaonema monthly during the spring and summer months using a half-strength solution of an all-purpose houseplant fertilizer, such as our All Purpose Fertilizer (20-20-20). The amount of light your plant receives will affect the intensity of its variegation. The more sun it gets, the brighter the colors become.

Is Aglaonema Mary Ann An Indoor Plant?

Aglaonema Mary Ann can be grown indoors and thrives in moderate to bright indirect light. Daily exposure to direct sunlight may cause yellow or dark spots on the leaves. Aglaonema Mary Ann needs bright light. If you can’t provide it with sufficient light, humidity, and temperature, it won’t thrive.

But if you take care of it properly, your Aglaonema Mary Ann will flower and make you happy. Usually plants are grown as houseplants in a location with moderate humidity (50% – 60%) and average indoor light intensity. Temperature ranges between 60 °F and 80 °F (16 °C to 26 °C) are recommended.

The soil should be well drained and the pot should be filled with potting soil. If you can’t provide these conditions, a good option is to place your plant in a humidifier or next to a steamy shower. When watering, avoid keeping the soil soggy and allow drainage by leaving the drainage whole open.

Is Aglaonema Mary Ann Toxic?

Aglaonema Mary Ann is toxic. However, the toxicity of Aglaonema Mary Ann is very low, so you don’t need to worry about your pets eating your plant. According to the ASPCA, cats are generally considered to be more resistant than dogs to the chemicals in Aglaonema Mary Ann plants.

The leaves and seeds are poisonous, causing vomiting and diarrhea. The plant contains calcium oxalate crystals that irritate the mouth, throat, tongue and esophagus if ingested, which may cause swelling. For some people they can be fatal.

It is recommended to keep the plant away from children, pregnant women, pets and livestock. Symptoms include vomiting, excess saliva or diarrhea and constipation. Aglaonema Mary Ann can be poisonous to humans and should not be brought indoors to grow as a houseplant.

How Do You Propagate Aglaonema Mary Ann?

Aglaonema Mary Ann can be propagated by taking stem or leaf cuttings, division and offsets. You can also divide your plants if you want to increase the number of plants in your garden. Make sure that all divisions are rooted in soil before planting.

When cutting a stem, cut an inch off the bottom and remove all the new growth. Split the remaining stem in two and plant the two halves. Take leaf cuttings from a leaf and plant in containers that contain a well-drained, moist and peaty mixture.

Do not over water the cuttings or they will rot. Place in a warm, dark location until plants root. Once rooted, transfer to proper potting soil and grow as usual. The following are the steps to follow when propagating Aglaonema Mary Ann:

Propagation by stem or leaf cutting;

  • Take stem or leaf cuttings from your plant during the spring and fall months. Remove lower leaves and set the cutting in a glass of water until the bottom sink.
  • Plant cuttings in well-drained potting soil and place them in a bright light, airy location until stems root and leaves begin to grow.
  • Transplant young plant into an 8-inch pot and place it in a sunny location until plant develops established root system.
  • Provide adequate water and ensure that plants remain moist so that soil does not dry out.
  • You can also divide your plants if you want to increase the number of plants in your garden.

Propagation by division;

  • Dig a hole in your garden soil around 3 inches deeper than the plant is growing. Be sure to leave a small portion of the root ball in the ground.
  • Remove any dead leaves and roots from the stem end of the plant, leaving only a three-inch portion of roots.
  • For plants that are growing in containers, loosen the soil around the roots with a shovel, then prune as above.
  • Place the plant in its original location back into the soil. Fill in around your plant with dirt and water it thoroughly until water drains from ground outside of hole or container.
  • Move plants back into their original location once new growth appears.

Propagation by offset;

  • Use a sharp knife to cut away any dead roots or leaves on your plant.
  • Take well-rooted plant off of its parent plant and separate with a sharp knife.
  • Plant in pot with well-draining potting soil in a location receiving partial sun and water until the new offset has established its own root system.
  • Place in sun to dry out. Once dry, transplant into appropriate spot in your garden.
  • Give your plant plenty of water and fertilizer to replace what was lost during transplanting.

Can Aglaonema Mary Ann Be Pruned?

You can prune Aglaonema Mary Ann by cutting off parts of the plant in order to control its size and growth. To control your plant’s size, you should prune it once or twice a year.  Apart from controlling your plant’s size, pruning helps you achieve the look that you want. When pruning plants, you should cut or pinch of the plant after its flowers fade.

To prune your Aglaonema Mary Ann, wait until spring. Cut away any dead leaves and stems on your plants. The best cuttings to remove are the ones that are damaged or broken.

When trimming stems and leaves, take each leaf off individually while holding the stem at a 45-degree angle away from the body of the plant. You don’t want to sever any of the leaf’s veins. Pruning should be done in early spring before the plant flowers for the first time.

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