Reticulate Venation
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Reticulate Venation Leaves & Plants | Reticulate Venation Diagram & Examples

 

What is Reticulate Venation?

Reticulate venation is a pattern of branching veins that are visible on the surface of leaves. Reticulate venation can be seen when looking at the leaf’s underside, or sometimes even in cross-section. The patterns vary depending on which type they are and what species it belongs to.

Reticulate venation often has veins that are raised, ridged, or wrinkled giving them a wire netted appearance. The veins may be multiple colors, brown or black, and they are typically more noticeable on the leaf’s underside. Reticulate venation begins in the center of the leaf or in the petiole’s axil and extends out to the margin.

The term reticulate venation is derived from a Latin word meaning “net-like,” which describes what this pattern looks like.

Reticulate venation is common among many plants, such as these Primulas. Notice that when you look closely at these primulas’ underside, you can see a number of different colored veins. The underside is more obvious because it is not as translucent as the top side. Typically, the veins are raised and ridged, creating a “netted” effect.

The reticulate venation pattern is found in various plants. It could be the blade, the leaflet, or the scale. To be able to identify a plant with this kind of venation, one must be able to identify its veins.

Three main veins are found to have a higher degree of details and usually more prominent than the other vein. The major three veins are the midrib, secondary veins, and tertiary veins.

The reticulate venation pattern is very specific and unique to the plant’s kingdom. It has an upper and lower vein running perpendicular to each other. It appears like a net or a spider web. This pattern is called reticulate venation and is very specific to the plant kingdom.

Reticulate venation is a pattern that is found to be in various plant species. It is different for all species of plants. The leaves that have a reticulate venation pattern have a specific order or arrangement of veins along the leaf blade and on the leaf margins.

Characteristics of Reticulate Venation Leaf

The characteristics of reticulate venation are:

  • Reticulate venation leaf is a type of leaf with veins that are reticulated or net-like.
  • The veins form an intricate pattern on the surface of the leaf
  • This pattern is created by branching from a central vein and then rejoining it in symmetrical patterns.
  • This pattern is created by veins that radiate out from the base of the petiole and then loop back to meet at the margin.
  •  The vein intersections create small, diamond-shaped areas called areoles where there is no vascular tissue.
  • The name reticulate comes from the Latin word for “net-like” or “network.” This type of vein pattern can be seen in leaves, stems, and roots.
  • The veins may be multiple colors, brown or black, and they are typically more noticeable on the leaf’s underside.

Reticulate Venation Examples

The reticulate venation pattern is found in the leaves of the common oak and beech trees in addition to blueberry shrubs. In some plants, the pattern is very prominent, while in others, it is very subtle. The pattern can be seen best when viewed under a microscope or a high-powered device.

This pattern is very specific to the plant kingdom and only occurs in plants. There are also variations in the pattern. Most of these variations occur in the number of tertiary veins or their placement along the leaf blade’s midrib.

Reticulate Venation and Parallel Venation

Reticulate venation is a pattern of branching veins in the leaves. There are three types of reticulate venation: parallel, collateral, and net-like.

  • Parallel reticulate venation has two or more sets of veins that run side by side on the leaf surface. In this type, both sets of veins originate from one point at or near the leaf blade base.
  • Collateral reticulate venation occurs when there is only one set of veins in a leaf that starts from both sides to meet at a central point where they form an X shape called an intersectional line.
  • Net-like patterns occur when many intersecting reticular lines form squares across the leaf surface.

Reticulate Venation Examples Diagram

Reticulate venation leaf is a type of plant leaf with veins that branch out and crisscross each other.

Reticulate Venation

Reticulate Venation Plants

Reticulate venation leaves are characterized by a network of veins that form a reticular pattern.  These types of leaves can be found on plants such as the fig tree, mulberry, and grapevine.  The vein patterns are often used to identify plant species.

In plants such as ferns, the branching veins form a network of mesh-like patterns on the leaf’s surface.

Types of Reticulate Venation

There are two forms of reticulate venation:

Pinnately Reticulate Venation (Unicostate Reticulate Venation)

There is only one midrib in the pinnately reticulate venation, which runs from the leaves’ base to the apex. As a result, it is also known as unicostate reticulate venation. Many lateral veins and veinlets emerge from the midrib, creating a network pattern. Consider the fruit mango. Ficus religiosa, Nerium (Mangifera indica).

Palmately reticulate venation.

More main veins are originating from the base of the leaf in palmately reticulate venation. As a result, it is also known as the multicostate form. Palmately reticulate or multicostate venation is further classified into two types:

  • Divergent type: When all major veins arise from the base and diverge towards the leaf’s margin, as in Cucurbita, Luffa, Carica papaya, and so on.
  • Convergent: When the veins of a plant converge at the leaf’s apex, as in Indian plum (Zizyphus), bay leaf is said to be converging (Cinnamomum)

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